Award of TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015


Recent tourney success of one of my few problems with checking aim has put into my head an idea to propose this aim as theme for Marianka fairy tourney. This idea was supported by the fact that in the past there were few theme tourneys for checking aim, yet one of them was organized in Slovakia. So I told to myself: why not?

As I wanted to put emphasis on check, in judging I have examined the submission from the point of view: can the problem be easily transformed into usual checkmate aim or it has something check-specific in it? This criterion has caused exclusion of a few ambitious entries from the award, most notably of one complete Lacny cycle and one carousel change in s#2 with three le Grands thrown in for a good measure.

The latter problem had also the same mechanism as s#2 from 2000, i.e. two reasons for unfortunate exclusion. Almost complete anticipation has caused exclusion of one seriesmover too.

In spite of the mentioned losses, there were still plenty of problems deserving being shown to the public. Thus I have decided to award 12 of 32 competing problems. While lower places probably would not score in non-thematic tourney with a strict judge, they can serve as an inspiration to others.

2nd Special Place: Ladislav Salai jr. & Michal Dragoun & Emil Klemanic
When I have announced the theme, I had no idea how I could check the problems where the checkmate would not be allowed. And some authors have approached me exactly with this idea in mind, partially inspired by +2 from the announcement. Their help problems in SAT were complicated enough, but I was able to find some cooks in computer listings among those that I have considered checkmates. However when another team of authors, LS&MD&EK have given me this h#2 it turned out WinChloe does indeed ignore checkmates. And so I have learnt something. The program is even better than I thought in this respect.

1st Special Place: Jaroslav Stun
Suprising idea: as the tourney announcement allowed any stipulations with check aim, the author has chosen to show checks that are in fact triple-checks. And it worked! The technicalities are not so important in this case, but let's have a look at them anyway. Only neutral pieces on the board including neutral rook piece mean good use of both fairy conditions as White has to check with two pawns as well as something just above royal rook in the final positions. If only there was not imbalance of the phases content (1+2+2)!

10th Place: Mario Parrinello
Antikings is a fairy condition radically changing notion of check. A king not attacked by enemy piece is checked. Here, depending on the position of black nightrider we get two echoed solutions.

9th Place: Alexej Oganesjan
While the variation play is banal, I liked the parallel movements of kings in three tries - black king refuting the try by imitating wK's movement. Just enough for 4 pieces.

8th Place: Luis Miguel Martin
Only Ph2 can check bK at all, but first he has to transport the pawn to square where it is possible. Depending on the position of bK, it has tu run around the board clockwise or anticlockwise. The latter case is even slightly complicated by final moving of wP to c2 without running around. The position can be turned to one with two solutions of equal length by the following: bPc5->c7, +wpc5, +bpc6, bKc3->b4, ser-h+65, 2 solutions.

7th Place: Paul Raican
The actions of Black have double function: allowing bP to promote as wK cannot be checked with pawn in this shape and placing white pieces so that Black can be forced to check at the end. Bearing both aims in mind, Vertical Mirror Circe is well used and black royal battery at the end is a nice finish.

6th Place: Valerij Semenenko
Alphabetic chess has gained some popularity recently, most probably in connection with Orbit TT and further explorations in CJF's Fairings. Repeated promotions are nothing surprising in this context, but it is worth to look at familiar strategy. In seriesmover, Black first has to allow his bK move, but as his majesty is (in Inverse Alphabetic chess) the last in queue, black queens must very quickly move westwards. Why queens? Because wR is the last in queue as well. There is a lot of guarding and also some pin in action and finally bK must play precisely to e1. Good check!

5th Place: Ladislav Packa
The author has had mutiple versions - hs+2,5 saved two wPs for price of twin moving white king and so on. Perhaps this is not the best version either, I feel there is still possibility to improve play, but I was unable to prove it in short time. The idea of sealing the black pieces off in the corner is not new, it has been shown in hs# as well, but the present form is clean and understandable.
(13.9.2015: See also the "after Marianka" version saving 2 pawns.)

4th Place: Themis Argirakopoulos
Some fairy conditions are more suitable for Babson task than other. Messigny chess definitely is very suitable. What I like about the present example? Casualness of mechanism - one needn't care about wK's flights thanks to check aim, then also unity of play (Messigny move on both B2 and B3), unified twinning mechanism and very light position.

3rd Place: Luis Miguel Martin
Another seriesmover with single wP available for checking, but with very nice and unexpected point. While b) position solution is strightforward (if we can say that about the 1st move 1.Kd8 away from the main actions in the seemingly very open position): white puts enough black pawns onto the board, then captures Ph4 and then Ph3 can check. But one more pawn is a big difference: with bPg3 white king is unable to leave h4 without leaving another pawn behind. That is why White has to involve promotion of Ph3. The problem has very nice construction with two different sharply differenced solutions in the light position.

2nd Place: Vasyl Dyachuk & Valerij Kopyl
No fairy elements (besides stipulation), but yet very rich twomover thanks to excellent Forsberg twinning. The main idea is fairly easy: white has to wait to black king move to specific square for checking. With Ra7, Ba7 and Sa7 it is easy, with Pa7 there is slightly surprising promotion (aha!), to round up economic Z-42-28 (also called four-phase Zagorujko). The problem can be compared to #2 with fairy pieces, but I really prefer clean check version without artificial condition (Haaner chess).

1st Place: Ladislav Salai jr. & Michal Dragoun & Emil Klemanic
The main scheme of this +2 is easy to explain: three bK flights d7, e7, e8 are under potential checks by wQ: Qb5 (d7, e8), Qe5 (e8, e7), Qg7 (e7, d7). It is just necessary to make bK move to these squares. wQ is tamed especially by Ba1, thus White employs his EQh2. Keys by LIc4 provide hurdles for threat checks and bK has to move. However lion moves have some additional motifs: they close one wQ potential checking line each and also activate some white pieces to squares e8, d7, e7. Both effects contribute to dual prevention so that in effect there is clean carousel change in action. Given the strong white force needed for this content it is no surprise Black needs a few pieces to fight cooks. The result is worth it: Z-32-33 with very unified truly check oriented mechanism.

Thanks to all participants and congratulations to winners!

Juraj Lrinc
International Judge of the FIDE for fairies
Marianka - Bratislava, 22.8.-29.8.2015

Ladislav Salai jr.
Michal Dragoun
Emil Klemanic

2nd Special Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1.exf6 c3 2.Bd6 cxb4+

1.e5 cxb3 2.Ra1 bxa4+

1.e6 c4 2.Be8 cxb5+

When I have announced the theme, I had no idea how I could check the problems where the checkmate would not be allowed. And some authors have approached me exactly with this idea in mind, partially inspired by +2 from the announcement. Their help problems in SAT were complicated enough, but I was able to find some cooks in computer listings among those that I have considered checkmates. However when another team of authors, LS&MD&EK have given me this h#2 it turned out WinChloe does indeed ignore checkmates. And so I have learnt something. The program is even better than I thought in this respect.









h+2 (6+12)
SAT
3.1.1.1

Jaroslav Stun
1st Special Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1.nSe5 g2 2.nBxe5(e2) nrRf2 3.nBf4 nrRf3+++

b) 1.g6 nrRxf3(f7) 2.nBc5 nBf8 3.e6 nrRf7+++
    1.nrRxf3(f2)+ nrRf4 2.nrRh4 f3 3.nBe5 nrRe4+++

c) 1.nSxd4(d2) b4 2.nSc6 d4 3.nrRf5 nrRc5+++
    1.nrRe8 nSxf3(f7)+ 2.f5 nSg5 3.nSe6 nrRxe6(e7)+++

Suprising idea: as the tourney announcement allowed any stipulations with check aim, the author has chosen to show checks that are in fact triple-checks. And it worked! The technicalities are not so important in this case, but let's have a look at them anyway. Only neutral pieces on the board including neutral rook piece mean good use of both fairy conditions as White has to check with two pawns as well as something just above royal rook in the final positions. If only there was not imbalance of the phases content (1+2+2)!









h+++3 (0+0+4)
Annan chess, Descending Protean Circe
royal neutral Rf8
a) 1.1...
b) npd5->d3, 2.1...
c) nSd4, 2.1...

Mario Parrinello
10th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1...Nxf5 2.Kh6 Nb3 3.dxe3+ Kd4+

b) 1...Nxe5 2.Kg6 Na3 3.d3+ Kc4+

Antikings is a fairy condition radically changing notion of check. A king not attacked by enemy piece is checked. Here, depending on the position of black nightrider we get two echoed solutions.









hs+2,5 (4+5)
Antikings
nightrider b3
b) b3 -» a3

Alexej Oganesjan
9th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1.Bf3? th. 2.Bd1+
1...Kb1!

1.Ke3? th. 2.Be4+
1...Kc1!

1.Kd4? th. 2.Be4+
1...Kb2!

1.Kd5? th. 2.Be4+
1...Kb3!

1.Kf5! th. 2.Be4+
1...Kc1 2.Bf4+
1...Kd1 2.Bf3+
1...Kb2 2.Be5+
1...Kd2 2.Bf4+
1...Kb3 2.Bd5+
1...Kc3 2.Be5+

While the variation play is banal, I liked the parallel movements of kings in three tries - black king refuting the try by imitating wK's movement. Just enough for 4 pieces.









+2 (3+1)

Luis Miguel Martin
8th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1.Kd2 2.Ke1 3.Kf1 4.Kg1 5.Kxh2(g1) 6.Kh3 7.Kh4 8.Kh5 9.Kh6 10.Kg7 11.Kf8 12.Ke8 13.Kd8 14.Kc7 15.Kb6 16.Ka5 17.Kb4 18.Kc3 19.Kd2 20.Ke1 21.Kf1 22.Kxg1(f1) 23.Kh2 24.Kh3 25.Kh4 26.Kh5 27.Kh6 28.Kg7 29.Kf8 30.Ke8 31.Kd8 32.Kc7 33.Kb6 34.Ka5 35.Kb4 36.Kc3 37.Kd2 38.Ke1 39.Kxf1(e1) 40.Kg1 41.Kh2 42.Kh3 43.Kh4 44.Kh5 45.Kh6 46.Kg7 47.Kf8 48.Ke8 49.Kd8 50.Kc7 51.Kb6 52.Ka5 53.Kb4 54.Kc3 55.Kd2 56.Kxe1(d2) 57.Kd1 58.Kc2 59.Kxd2(c2) 60.Kc3 61.Kb4 c3+

b) 1.Ka5 2.Kb6 3.Kc7 4.Kd8 5.Ke8 6.Kf8 7.Kg7 8.Kh6 9.Kh5 10.Kh4 11.Kh3 12.Kxh2(h3) 13.Kg1 14.Kf1 15.Ke1 16.Kd2 17.Kc3 18.Kb4 19.Ka5 20.Kb6 21.Kc7 22.Kd8 23.Ke8 24.Kf8 25.Kg7 26.Kh6 27.Kh5 28.Kh4 29.Kxh3(h4) 30.Kh2 31.Kg1 32.Kf1 33.Ke1 34.Kd2 35.Kc3 36.Kb4 37.Ka5 38.Kb6 39.Kc7 40.Kd8 41.Ke8 42.Kf8 43.Kg7 44.Kh6 45.Kh5 46.Kxh4(h5) 47.Kh3 48.Kh2 49.Kg1 50.Kf1 51.Ke1 52.Kd2 53.Kc3 54.Kb4 55.Ka5 56.Kb6 57.Kc7 58.Kd8 59.Ke8 60.Kf8 61.Kg7 h6+

Only Ph2 can check bK at all, but first he has to transport the pawn to square where it is possible. Depending on the position of bK, it has tu run around the board clockwise or anticlockwise. The latter case is even slightly complicated by final moving of wP to c2 without running around. The position can be turned to one with two solutions of equal length by the following: bPc5->c7, +wpc5, +bpc6, bKc3->b4, ser-h+65, 2 solutions.









ser-h+61 (8+5)
PWC
b) c3 -» b4

Paul Raican
7th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1.Kd8 2.Ke8 3.Kf8 4.Kg7 5.Kg6 6.Kf5 7.Ke4 8.Kd3 9.Kd2 10.Kxc1(Rh1) 11.Kd2 12.Kd3 13.Ke4 14.Kf5 15.Kg6 16.Kg7 17.Kf8 18.Ke8 19.Kd8 20.Kc8 21.Kb7 22.Ka6 23.Kb5 24.Kb4 25.Kxa3 26.Kb4 27.Kb5 28.Ka6 29.Kb7 30.Kc8 31.Kd8 32.Ke8 33.Kf8 34.Kg7 35.Kg6 36.Kf5 37.Ke4 38.Kd3 39.Kd2 40.Kc1 41.Kb1 42.Kxa1(Sb1) 43.Kxb1 44.Kc1 45.Kd2 46.Kd3 47.Ke4 48.Kf5 49.Kg6 50.Kg7 51.Kf8 52.Ke8 53.Kd8 54.Kc8 55.Kb7 56.Ka6 57.Kb5 58.Kb4 59.Kxb3(Bc1) 60.Kxa4 61.Kb4 62.a4 63.a3 64.a2 65.a1Q 66.Qa3 & 1.Rh4+ Ka5,Kc3,Kb3,Kb5+

The actions of Black have double function: allowing bP to promote as wK cannot be checked with pawn in this shape and placing white pieces so that Black can be forced to check at the end. Bearing both aims in mind, Vertical Mirror Circe is well used and black royal battery at the end is a nice finish.









66B -> ser-s+1 (8+2)
Vertical Mirror Circe

Valerij Semenenko
6th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1.h1Q 2.Qa1 3.g1Q 4.Qb1 5.f1Q 6.Qc1 7.e1Q 8.Qd1 9.Ke1 Re8+

Alphabetic chess has gained some popularity recently, most probably in connection with Orbit TT and further explorations in CJF's Fairings. Repeated promotions are nothing surprising in this context, but it is worth to look at familiar strategy. In seriesmover, Black first has to allow his bK move, but as his majesty is (in Inverse Alphabetic chess) the last in queue, black queens must very quickly move westwards. Why queens? Because wR is the last in queue as well. There is a lot of guarding and also some pin in action and finally bK must play precisely to e1. Good check!









ser-h+9 (5+7)
Inverse Alphabetic chess

Ladislav Packa
5th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1.Kd7 Rh8 2.Rg8 Bd8 3.Kxd8 Rxg8+

1.Kd6 Bh8 2.Rg7 Re5 3.Kxe5 Bxg7+

The author has had mutiple versions - hs+2,5 saved two wPs for price of twin moving white king and so on. Perhaps this is not the best version either, I feel there is still possibility to improve play, but I was unable to prove it in short time. The idea of sealing the black pieces off in the corner is not new, it has been shown in hs# as well, but the present form is clean and understandable.









hs+3 (5+5)
2.1.1.1.1.1

Themis Argirakopoulos
4th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1...g1Q 2.d8Q Qd8<->Qg1 3.Qe1+ Qe1<->Qd8+

b) 1...g1R 2.d8R Rd8<->Rg1 3.Rg4+ Rg4<->Rd8+

c) 1...g1B 2.d8B Bd8<->Bg1 3.Bf2+ Bf2<->Bd8+

d) 1...g1S 2.d8S Sd8<->Sg1 3.Sf3+ Sf3<->Sd8+

Some fairy conditions are more suitable for Babson task than other. Messigny chess definitely is very suitable. What I like about the present example? Casualness of mechanism - one needn't care about wK's flights thanks to check aim, then also unity of play (Messigny move on both B2 and B3), unified twinning mechanism and very light position.









hs+2,5 (4+6)
Messigny chess
b) c3 -» d4
c) c3 -» e1
d) c3 -» h2

Luis Miguel Martin
3rd Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1.Ke6(+e7) 2.Ke5(+e6) 3.Ke4(+e5) 4.Ke3(+e4) 5.Ke2(+e3) 6.Kxe3(+e2) 7.Kxe4(+e3) 8.Kf3 9.Kg4 10.Kxh4(+g4) 11.hxg4 12.g5 13.gxh6 14.h7 15.h8S+

b) 1.Kd8(+e7) 2.Kc7 3.Kc6(+c7) 4.Kc5(+c6) 5.Kc4(+c5) 6.Kc3(+c4) 7.Kc2(+c3) 8.Kd1 9.Ke2 10.Kf3 11.Kg4 12.Kxh4(+g4) 13.Kg3 14.h4 15.h5+

Another seriesmover with single wP available for checking, but with very nice and unexpected point. While b) position solution is strightforward (if we can say that about the 1st move 1.Kd8 away from the main actions in the seemingly very open position): white puts enough black pawns onto the board, then captures Ph4 and then Ph3 can check. But one more pawn is a big difference: with bPg3 white king is unable to leave h4 without leaving another pawn behind. That is why White has to involve promotion of Ph3. The problem has very nice construction with two different sharply differenced solutions in the light position.









ser-+15 (2+4)
Enemy Sentinelles
b) -bPg3

Vasyl Dyachuk
Valerij Kopyl

2nd Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

a) 1.Rd7! zz
1...Ka3 2.Rd3+
1...Kxa5 2.Rd5+

b) 1.b7! zz
1...Ka3 2.Bc5+
1...Kxa5 2.Bb6+

c) 1.c7! zz
1...Ka3 2.Sb5+
1...Kxa5 2.Sc6+

d) 1.a8Q! zz
1...Ka3 2.Qf8+
1...Kxa5 2.Qxa6+

No fairy elements (besides stipulation), but yet very rich twomover thanks to excellent Forsberg twinning. The main idea is fairly easy: white has to wait to black king move to specific square for checking. With Ra7, Ba7 and Sa7 it is easy, with Pa7 there is slightly surprising promotion (aha!), to round up economic Z-42-28 (also called four-phase Zagorujko). The problem can be compared to #2 with fairy pieces, but I really prefer clean check version without artificial condition (Haaner chess).









+2 (6+2)
b) wBa7
c) wSa7
d) wPa7

Ladislav Salai jr.
Michal Dragoun
Emil Klemanic

1st Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015

1...Ke7 2.LIc6+, Qg7+, Qe5+
1...Kd7 2.LIe6+, Qb5+, Qg7+
1...Ke8 2.LIf7+, Qb5+, Qe5+

1.LIf7? th. 2.EQxh6+
1...Ke7 2.Qe5+
1...Kd7 2.Qb5+
1...RLh5!

1.LIe6? th. 2.EQf4+
1...Ke7 2.Qg7+
1...Ke8 2.Qb5+
1...BLe1!

1.LIc6! th. 2.EQb4+
1...Ke8 2.Qe5+
1...Kd7 2.Qg7+

The main scheme of this +2 is easy to explain: three bK flights d7, e7, e8 are under potential checks by wQ: Qb5 (d7, e8), Qe5 (e8, e7), Qg7 (e7, d7). It is just necessary to make bK move to these squares. wQ is tamed especially by Ba1, thus White employs his EQh2. Keys by LIc4 provide hurdles for threat checks and bK has to move. However lion moves have some additional motifs: they close one wQ potential checking line each and also activate some white pieces to squares e8, d7, e7. Both effects contribute to dual prevention so that in effect there is clean carousel change in action. Given the strong white force needed for this content it is no surprise Black needs a few pieces to fight cooks. The result is worth it: Z-32-33 with very unified truly check oriented mechanism.









+2 (12+11)
equihopper h2, lion c4
1+1 nightrider lion
0+2 rook lion, 3+3 bishop lion

Branko Koludrovic
Problemkiste 2000

1.Kb4 2.Ka3 3.Ka2 4.Kb1 5.Kc2 6.Kd1 7.Ke2 8.Kf3 9.Kg4 10.Kh5 11.Kh6 12.Kh7 13.Kg8 14.Kf8 15.Ke8 16.Kd8 17.Kc8 18.Kb8 19.Ka7 20.Kb8 21.Kc8 22.Kd8 23.Ke8 24.Kf8 25.Kg8 26.Kh7 27.Kh6 28.Kh5 29.Kg4 30.Kf3 31.Ke2 32.Kd1 33.Kc2 34.Kb1 35.Ka2 36.Ka3 37.Kb4 38.Ka5(Sb8) 39.Kb4 40.Ka3 41.Ka2 42.Kb1 43.Kc2 44.Kd1 45.Ke2 46.Kf3 47.Kg4 48.Kh5 49.Kh6 50.Kh7 51.Kg8 52.Kf8 53.Ke8 54.Kd8 55.Kc8 56.Kb8 57.Kc8 58.Kd8 59.Ke8 60.Kf8 61.Kg8 62.Kh7 63.Kh6 64.Kh5 65.Kg4 66.Kf3 67.Ke2 68.Kd1 69.Kc2 70.Kb1 71.Ka2 72.Ka3 73.Kb4 74.Kb5 75.Kc6(Ra8) 76.Kc5(Sb8) 77.Kd5 78.Ke4 79.Kf3 80.Kg4 81.Kh5 82.Kh6 83.Kh7 84.Kg8 85.Kf8 86.Ke8 87.Kd8 88.Kc8 89.Kb7 90.Ka8 91.Kb8 92.Kc8 93.Kd7

The obstacles to move to d7 are set up so that even after capture of Sa5, Rc6 and Sc5 it is still necessary to recapture them at their rebirth squares. That makes possible required 93 moves with only 11 pieces on the board. Note that Pd2 cannot be captured before Rc6 and Sc5 disappear (otherwise there would be unbreakable circle for wK thanks to pawn rebirth) and after capture of Sc5 it makes no sense anymore. Excellent construction.









ser-[d7]93 (3+8)
Circe

Arno Tüngler
1st Comm feenschach 1998

1...Ke4 2.Sxf2+

1.b8Q? th. 2.Qh8+,Qf4+
1...e5!

1.b8R? th. 2.Rb4+
1...Sc3!

1.b8B? th. 2.Be5+
1...Se4!

1.b8S? th. 2.Sc6+
1...Kc3!

1.Sf4! th. 2.Sxe6+
1...Kc3 2.Sxd5+
1...Ke4 2.Bd3+
(1...Ke5 2.Sd3+,Sg6+,b8Q+)

Try-oriented problem perfectly employing condition. Black king has two flights, c3 and e4. Black defends against promotions by blocks (R, B), limiting checks to checkmates (Q) or simple walk out of threat piece range (S). The solution uses the condition too: Black cannot defend by 1...Bf5+ as this would be checkmate.









+2 (7+10)
No checkmates

Ladislav Packa
5th Place
TT Marianka 2015 - Fairies C 22.8.2015
"after Marianka" version

1.Kb7 Rh8 2.Rg8 Bb8 3.Kxb8 Rxg8+

1.Kc5 Bh8 2.Rg7 Rd4 3.Kxd4 Bxg7+

Saving 2 pawns compared to original version is improvement worth showing. Now I am quite satisfied with content-form combination.









hs+3 (3+5)
2.1.1.1.1.1

Comments to Juraj Lörinc.
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